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sheila-jackson-leeRep. Sheila Jackson Lee of Texas has added another ballad to her greatest hits album. This time she suggested that the House of Representatives change the common usage of the word ‘welfare’ to something more palatable, and less shameful, like ‘transitional living fund.’

She praised the current welfare programs,  and apparently thinks the name change will encourage more people to stop being so shy and hop on the gravy train. A little research uncovered just how much of a hypocrite Rep. Jackson Lee is. Read more…

1 comment » | Government, News, Politics

Disability is the New Welfare

↳ Posted on July 17th, 2012 by Ben Spera

There’s an interesting article on Drudge Report today. According to the Senate Budget Committee, more Americans have enrolled in federal disability than found a job in the last quarter. I’ve had a beef with disability for a while. From personal experience, it seems people that are legitimately disabled bust their hump to stay employed and prove that their just as good as everyone else. The people I see on disability don’t seem any more disabled than the next guy who shows up to work every day. I hear ridiculous claims of unemployability due to being overweight, having ADD, too depressed to work, or ambiguous excuses of they “just don’t get along with others.”

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Comment » | News, Politics


A Libertarian Case for Net Neutrality

Posted on January 25th, 2014 by Ben Spera

14137_large_net_neutralityAs a libertarian you may be uneasy with the concept of net neutrality. Like me, you feel inexplicably drawn to this neutrality but feel guilty for it. You think to yourself, “I’m a free-market libertarian, by God! Regulation is wrong! Why is my instinct betraying me?” It’s because we don’t live in perfect world. We live in an economy that is far from free and is infested with government regulations and corporate manipulation. The internet service industry is a picturesque example of this.
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Congress Took over 200 Years to Ratify Amendment Regulating Pay

Posted on July 1st, 2014 by Ben Spera

MediumThe 27th amendment to the United States Constitution was submitted to Congress for ratification on September 25th, 1789. This amendment, which added limits on how Congress could give themselves pay raises, took an unbelievable 202 years, 7 months, 12 days to finally be ratified. Even then, it seemed only to be ratified unintentionally. The average ratification time of the remaining 26 amendments is only 1 year, 8 days. This disparity makes it hard to dispute an apparent double standard when it comes to congressional self-regulation. Read more…

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